Profile

First Draft

     All of my life I have been surrounded by somebody in a helping profession. My mom was an RN, a Director of Nursing at a Long Term Care Facility and finally the Volunteer Hospice Coordinator in Haliburton County. I had an uncle whom worked with clients in group home. Even in my own past I was involved in a helping field as I am an addictions counsellor. So it was natural for me to choose the PSW program for my next career venture (or should I say adventure)!  When I had to choose a person to profile I immediately knew it was going to be someone in the health field. I chose to interview a PSW, as an introduction to my clinical and to get some back ground for my own information.

     The definition of a support worker is;” a health care worker who provides services to people who need help with their daily needs, both in facilities and in the community.” (Sorrentino, S A. & Remmert, L, 2013. Pg.3). These type of workers are in high demand as our population ages. Statistics Canada states that there were 5,780,900 residents over 65 years of age as of July 1, 2015 (StatsCan, (2015, September 29). I chose to interview Laura, who works at a local nursing home.

     I choose to go and observe over breakfast, as I found out one of the busiest times of day for the PSW. The amount of organized chaos that was getting the residents ready for the day was eye opening. I asked Laura what the key was to successfully getting everyone ready in a timely and organized way, she stated “organization, patience and routine and a good sense of humour.” (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016).

     Then each resident is brought down to a common dining room. Each has their own specific place to sit and it never changes. Some are sat at tables, others sit to the sides. Most are able to feed themselves, but there are those that require help with their nutrition intake.  Laura is responsible to get all her residents down to the dining room by a certain time daily after getting them ready for the day. It is the same for all the meals at the facility. Laura commented that each meal time is different, “you never know how each resident will act or react to a meal, if they are hungry, not feeling well, didn’t sleep well….so many factors can affect mealtime.”  (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016). When asked what the best possible outcome was over meal time for the residents, Laura related that it was imperative to get as much nutrition into the residents to keep them strong and healthy.  (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016). After they are done with their meals the residents have the choice of what to do. There are different activities for them to do. Some may have hair appointments, day outings with their families. Some may go back to their room for a nap or to watch TV. It is strongly encouraged that they partake in as much as they can. (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016).

     After spending my time with Laura and through the interview process , I was more confident that I have made the right career move for myself. In fact it was my first question to her that spoke to me the most. I asked Laura why she became a PSW. Her answer; “I came to this field because I care, I can do something to help maintain or improve a person’s quality of life, then I can go home satisfied I did a good job. Every day is not good, but there is always a good point in every day.” (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016). That to me says it all! In the end it all comes down to caring and helping.

References

Sorrentino, S. A., & Remmert, L. N. (2013). Mosby’s Canadian textbook for the support worker. Toronto, ON: Elsevier.

 The Daily — Canada’s population estimates: Age and sex … (2015, September 29). Retrieved October 17, 2016, from http://statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150929/dq150929b-eng.htm

 

SECOND  DRAFT

All of my life I have been surrounded by somebody in a helping profession. My mother was an RN, Director of Nursing at a Long Term Care Facility and also a Volunteer Hospice Coordinator in Haliburton County. I also have an uncle who worked with clients in group home. Even in my own past, I too was involved in a helping field as I am an addictions counselor. So it was natural for me to choose the PSW program for my next career venture, or should I say adventure!  When I had to choose a person to profile I immediately knew it was going to be someone in the healthcare field. I decided to interview a PSW, as an introduction to my clinical and to also gain some back ground knowledge for my own personal use.

The definition of a support worker is; “a health care worker who provides services to people who need help with their daily needs, both in facilities and in the community.” (Sorrentino, S A. & Remmert, L, 2013. Pg.3). These type of workers are in high demand as our population ages. Statistics Canada states that there were 5,780,900 residents over 65 years of age as of July 1, 2015 (StatsCan, (2015, September 29). I chose to interview Laura, who works at a local nursing home.

I decided to go and observe over breakfast, as I sat there I found out that this is the busiest time of day for a PSW. The amount of organized chaos of getting the residents ready for the day was eye opening. I asked Laura what the key was to successfully getting everyone ready in a timely and organized way, she stated “organization, patience and routine and a good sense of humor.” (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016). The morning routine includes getting up, washed or bathed, dressed, any medication that they require is taken and finally ready to go down to breakfast.

Each resident is brought down to a common dining room. Every resident has their own specific place to sit and it never changes. Some are sat at tables; others sit to the sides of the dining room who acquire extra care during their meals. Most residents are able to feed themselves, but a few others require help with their nutrition intake.  Laura is responsible to get all of her residents down to the dining room by a certain time every day after getting the prepared for the day. This is the same for all the of meals at the facility. Laura commented that each meal time is different, “you never know how each resident will act or react to a meal, if they are hungry, not feeling well, didn’t sleep well….so many factors can affect mealtime.” (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016). When asked what the best possible outcome was over meal time for the residents, Laura relayed that it was imperative to get as much nutrition into the residents to keep them strong and healthy. (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016). After they are done with their meals the residents have the choice of what to do. There are sorts of different activities for them to do. Some may have hair appointments, day outings with their families or some may even go back to their room for a nap or to watch TV. “It is strongly encouraged that they partake in as much as they can.” (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016).

After spending my time with Laura and through the interview process, I was more confident that I have made the right career move for myself. In fact, it was my first question to her that spoke to me the most. I asked Laura why she became a PSW, her answer; “I came to this field because I care, I can do something to help maintain or improve a person’s quality of life, then I can go home satisfied I did a good job. Every day is not good, but there is always a good point in every day.” (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016). That to me says it all! In the end it all comes down too caring and helping.
References

Sorrentino, S. A., & Remmert, L. N. (2013). Mosby’s Canadian textbook for the support worker. Toronto, ON: Elsevier.

 The Daily — Canada’s population estimates: Age and sex … (2015, September 29). Retrieved October 17, 2016, from http://statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150929/dq150929b-eng.htm

 

Final Draft

All my life I have been surrounded by somebody in a helping profession. My mother was an RN, Director of Nursing at a Long-Term Care Facility and a Volunteer Hospice Coordinator in Haliburton County. I also have an Uncle who worked with clients in group homes. Even in my own past, I too was involved in a helping field as I am an addictions counselor. So, it was natural for me to choose the PSW program for my next career venture, or should I say adventure!  When I heard the instructions to the profile, I immediately knew it was going to be someone in the healthcare field. I thought that it would be good to interview a PSW, as an introduction to my clinical and to also gain some background knowledge for my own personal use.

The definition of a support worker is; “a health care worker who provides services to people who need help with their daily needs, both in facilities and in the community.” (Sorrentino, S A. & Remmert, L, 2013. Pg.3). These types of workers are in high demand as our population ages. Statistics Canada states that there were 5,780,900 residents over 65 years of age as of July 1, 2015 (StatsCan, (2015, September 29). Laura, who has been a PSW for five years graciously let me follow her around for the morning. At a later date we completed the interview.

I decided to go and observe over breakfast, as I sat there I found out that this is the busiest time of day for a PSW. The amount of organized chaos of getting the residents ready for the day was eye-opening. I asked Laura what the key was to successfully get everyone ready in a timely and organized way, she stated “organization, patience and routine and a good sense of humor.” (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016). The morning routine includes getting up, washed or bathed, dressed, any medication that they require is taken and finally ready to go down to breakfast.

Each resident is brought down to a common dining room. Every resident has their own specific place to sit and it never changes. Some are sat at tables; others sit on the sides of the dining room who acquire extra care during their meals. Most residents can feed themselves, but a few others require help with their nutrition intake.  Laura is responsible for getting all of her residents down to the dining room by a certain time every day after getting the prepared for the day. This is the same for all the of meals at the facility. Laura commented that each meal time is different, “you never know how each resident will act or react to a meal, if they are hungry, not feeling well, didn’t sleep well….so many factors can affect mealtime.” (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016). When asked what, the best possible outcome was over meal time for the residents, Laura relayed that it was imperative to get as much nutrition into the residents to keep them strong and healthy. (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016). After they are done with their meals the residents have the choice of what to do. There are sorts of different activities for them to do. Some may have hair appointments, day outings with their families or some may even go back to their room for a nap or to watch TV. “It is strongly encouraged that they partake in as much as they can.” (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016).

After spending my time with Laura and through the interview process, I was more confident that I have made the right career move for myself. In fact, it was my first question to her that spoke to me the most. I asked Laura why she became a PSW, her answer; “I came to this field because I care, I can do something to help maintain or improve a person’s quality of life, then I can go home satisfied I did a good job. Every day is not good, but there is always a good point in every day.” (L. Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016). That to me says it all! In the end, it all comes down to caring and helping.

References

Sorrentino, S. A., & Remmert, L. N. (2013). Mosby’s Canadian textbook for the support worker. Toronto, ON: Elsevier.

The Daily — Canada’s population estimates:  Age and sex … (2015, September 29). Retrieved October 17, 2016, from http://statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150929/dq150929b-eng.htm

Blackbourn, interview, Oct 15, 2016.

 

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Profile

  1. Sean great job on your first draft it’s well written and cited well.. I think you found your calling as a PSW worker, and i think you kinda found it at a early age. I’m not sure how much you need to do to for the your second draft but I will keep an eye out.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s